Adding Cheap And Classy Storage To Your Shop

If your garage is like mine, it’s a mess.

Periodically you spend a weekend cleaning up; cramming your tools and scraps each into their respective spots (or wherever they will fit), and sweeping up the sawdust and shavings, leaving your shop spotless… until you start your next project.

At that point you dislodge a tool and the materials necessary to complete your project, and you may has well have just pulled the pin on a grenade.

A short time later your garage explodes in a flurry of tools and shrapnel, that leaves your garage as bad as it has ever been, and quite possibly worse, while it waits for another free weekend to be cleaned up.

Making matters worse, I have many times promised to get the garage clean enough for my wife to park her car, but I have thus far been unable to maintain the upper hand for long enough to actually pull the car into its place.

After extensive study of this phenomenon, I started to study the root cause. Surely this is not merely a symptom of being a lazy slob. Surely this is not merely my own fault….

…surely…

Thus, having ruled out personal flaws, I decided that the heart of the problem was simple: Storage.

I had some wire shelves, a rolling toolbox, a workbench, a hanging shelf, and a pegboard, but every tool I owned and used was living in increasingly cramped quarters, and there were some obvious opportunities to add enough space to get a little more capacity and flexibility in the storage system.

The first and largest opportunity: my metal working station.
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When I designed my metal working station, I left large openings with the intention of someday building drawers and shelves.

About a week ago I realized I was never going to find it worthwhile to spend a day building a bunch of drawers while I had a backlog of so many more important/interesting projects (swingset, porch lights, shed, small truck for my daughter, speargun, radius cutter for my lathe… and whatever else comes up between now and the finish of those).

What if I just bought some drawers?

At first I thought I thought I’d use a coupon to buy a couple Harbor Freight toolboxes, since they are so much cheaper than anything equivalent from Sears or Home Depot, but I’ would have still ended up spending a few hundred dollars.

What should I do?

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Enter the Swedes, stage left!

IKEA TO THE RESCUE!

$40 KULLEN 3 Drawer Chest

$59 - Oh MICKE You're so fine!

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Granted, there’s still a lot of cleanup to do, but I have now added more than enough storage for all of my metal working tools and work pieces.

And at a total of $100, it costed me less than I would have spent on the plywood and drawer slides to make the drawers that I would have never taken the time to build.

Those clever Swedes.

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Polespear Upgrades Update

After my previous modifications resulted in a slow spear that kept maiming and releasing fish, I went back to the shop and made it better.

To increase the speed, I ordered a 1/2-inch diameter band, but that turned out to be so stiff that I could barely stretch it, and if I did it bent the spear, so, that didn’t work.

Then I tried just adding a second band to the spear.
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This actually worked quite nicely. I had effectively doubled the power without making it too difficult to stretch.

Win.

Now to solve the problem of the fish wiggling off the spear.

I wanted to add barbs to the spear tips, so my first thought was to use a file. After looking at my file assortment, I realized that this would remove too much metal, and the barbs would really just be notches, they wouldn’t extend beyond the diameter of the tip, so I’m not sure how effective the would be.

So I instead cut slots at an angle with my hacksaw, and then was able to bend the metal outwards to form a proper barb.
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Done, and Done.

I went out to test it later that evening.
I didn’t see many fish for a long time, which is always a limiting factor in these tests.

But then, as the sun was going down, I saw a decent sized black perch and squeezed the trigger.

BANG!

The extra power made all the difference and the fish never knew what hit it… because it’s a fish.

The barbs were probably unnecessary in this case, since the polespear nearly blasted straight through the cute little fishy, but they certainly made the fish more difficult to remove from the spear, so I consider them a success as well.

Too bad I don’t like the taste of perch.

I gave the fish to the cats on the jetty and went home with a puffed chest and a bounce in my step.

I’m beginning to think of this design as a poor man’s speargun.

I like it. It’s simple and effective.

But now it has me thinking of other ways to make a cheap speargun…

Stay tuned…