Inca Bandsaw Fence – Part 3 – The Fence

And so we come to the conclusion of the Inca Bandsaw Fence series.

At this stage I had a rail for the fence to slide on, a carriage that follows and locks onto the rail, and a mounting bracket extending vertically from the carriage for the fence itself.

The best material I found to make a fence was extruded aluminum rectangular tubing (about 1.5 inches wide and 3 inches tall). Aluminum extrusions tend to be very straight and since my saw’s table is also aluminum, using a harder metal could possibly damage the table over time.

I picked up a 36-inch piece of the aforementioned tubing as a remnant from the local metal supply store ($2.70 per pound) and cut 16 inches off to make my fence.

The fence needed to be connected to the vertical bracket attached to the carriage. My first thought was to attach it with bolts on the backside of the fence, but then the width of the fence would be limiting the cutting capacity of the saw by a full 1.5-inches. So I decided to attach the bracket to the inside of the tubing.

In order to do this I cut a slot in the bottom of the fence, right along the front edge where I wanted to attach it to the carriage.

Then I drilled and countersank two mounting holes. I transferred the location of these holes to the bracket and then drilled holes in the bracket accordingly.
Bandsaw Fence - Mount
Bandsaw Fence - Mount
Note: If you are a particularly observant reader, you will notice that I showed a picture of the bracket in “part 2” of this series, but here I am claiming that they were drilled as a step in “part 3”.  Well done.

The arrangement of the holes is not merely aesthetic. If the holes were aligned with each other horizontally, they would provide only limited vertical support. Likewise vertical holes would provide limited horizontal support. My theory is that diagonally arranged holes will be the best of both worlds.

Bandsaw Fence - Mount

I inserted brass (because it’s pretty) machine screws through the holes and secured them with washers and locknuts (to prevent loosening during operation).
Bandsaw Fence
Bandsaw Fence

And that’s it.

IMAG1284Bandsaw Fence

There is a bit of flex on the far end of the fence if to apply a lot of lateral pressure, but since my workpieces will be small and kickback is not a concern on the bandsaw, I won’t be pressing hard against the fence, so I think it is rigid enough.

That said, I’ll probably tinker with it at some point to make the far end lock in place as well.

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2 thoughts on “Inca Bandsaw Fence – Part 3 – The Fence

  1. Pingback: Precision Preschmision. « GarageSandals

  2. Hey,

    This is great. I’ve just bought an inca (342 I think) from off TradeMe (New Zealand ebay). Picking it up tomorrow so already looking for tuning tips and how to build a fence. etc So thanks for sharing, it’s a nice design. Looks like we have similar interests (Wood and metal etc).: http://blog.rhysgoodwin.com

    Keep up the good work.

    Cheers,
    Rhys

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